Legal transcription plays a massive role in streamlining and further building efficiencies of the legal community. Transcribers are key to the security and development of faster & more accurate production of records. Several law firms & government departments have already included transcriptionists to service their legal documentation needs.

Efficiency demands respect & professionalism. At EIS, we deliver that

How does team EIS meet high efficiency of our legal eagles with its own?

Here’s how –

  • Our transcribers are highly experienced, certified court reporters, paralegals and secretaries.
  • We have a dedicated Internal Quality Audit Team for our legal transcription department, which includes attorneys & law enforcement officials.
  • Strong focus on information security and confidentiality.
  • We ensure tight security through restriction of access and monitoring of system at all times before, during and after a Legal Transcription project.
  • Upon delivery of all transcripts & client confirmation, we permanently erase all materials associated with the case.





EIS focus on content quality is second-to-none. We have a very efficient work process where onus on transcribers to “get it right the first time” is given utmost importance. FTR’s (first-time rights) greatly help in reducing burden on our quality control personnel, freeing up their time to pursue secondary analysis of documents and also feed-backing.

Legal transcription plays a massive role in streamlining and further building efficiencies of the legal community. Transcribers are key to the security and development of faster & more accurate production of records. Several law firms & government departments have already included transcriptionists to service their legal documentation needs.

This industry has been chugging along nicely and is now all set to exponentially increase, considering the ever-increasing demands on legal professionals to deliver quicker, clearer and cheaper results than ever before. When it comes to choosing the right Legal, Quality, Deadline Oriented Transcription Service Provider is really confusing and challenging as there are end number legal transcription and interpretation services providers available online.

When it comes to choosing the right Legal, Quality, Deadline Oriented Transcription Service Provider is really confusing and challenging as there are end number legal transcription and interpretation services providers available online.

Sign-up with EIS today, and you will never have a reason to worry any further!

You can even test us with a free sign-up trial.

For more details, call our Customer Support personnel !


Things to keep in mind while selecting the correct service provide:

Confidentiality is one of the most important components, along with accuracy (which ultimately dictates the quality of service) and timeliness when looking for a reliable transcription service provider.
Another equally important aspect is the accuracy, which largely determines the quality of information


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Things to keep in mind while selecting the correct service provide:


Confidentiality is one of the most important components, along with accuracy (which ultimately dictates the quality of service) and timeliness when looking for a reliable transcription service provider.

Another equally important aspect is the accuracy, which largely determines the quality of information.

And last but not least, timeliness is another important ingredient that sets a high-quality service provider apart from mediocre ones. Sometimes, lawyers, court clerks, etc., need transcript quick and cannot afford to wait for weeks or months.

Failure to deliver on time can spell disaster not just for the “schedule” of legal proceedings, but in some instances, it could even have a detrimental effect on the case involved.

Although not as critical as the aforementioned components, a service provider that utilizes user-friendly interface that allows for quick and easy upload of audio files is also a bonus point.

Of course, no service is considered good or at least decent without timely responsiveness totheir clients/customers’cases and Expert Info Services LLC. (EIS) aims to send responses within 2-3 hours during business working hours/days.

While it may be tempting to choose the lowest priced service provider, a “prudent” client should always prioritize finding a reputable company, which guarantees high quality, timeliness, confidentiality, and security. Anything else, including the price, is considered a secondary factor.

Simply put, a prudent client should seek a reputable legal transcription services provider whose fees are reasonable—not cheap.

EIS provides the following legal transcription and interpretation services but not limited to:

Here’s how –

  • Court room proceedings
  • Examinations under oath
  • Interrogations
  • Interviews
  • Legal briefs
  • Phone recordings
  • Legal pleadings
  • Judgments
  • Minutes of Meetings
  • Seminars and conferences
  • Agency investigations and Investigative interviews
  • Teleconferences and Calls
  • Telephone conversations

Court Room Proceedings

While movies and TV programs often portray court roomproceedings as emotionally charged, colorful, and glamorous events, the truth is they mainly consists of long, monotonous testimonies. Furthermore, hardly any member of the public is there to make a noise, much less a pandemonium


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Court Room Proceedings


While movies and TV programs often portray court roomproceedings as emotionally charged, colorful, and glamorous events, the truth is they mainly consists of long, monotonous testimonies. Furthermore, hardly any member of the public is there to make a noise, much less a pandemonium.

Learning the entities that play the most important roles in court proceedings can give you a more “realistic” picture.

• Lawyers

Their main task is to present facts that can help their clients win their case, or at least put it in the most favorable light. Sometimes they are also referred to as private attorneys, prosecutors (government’s lawyer), and public defender (court-appointed lawyer).

• Judge

He or she presides over court room proceedings, ensures that order is maintained, gives instructions to the jury, determines whether the evidence is proper, and gives sentence.

• Parties

They are entities or people directly involved in a lawsuit; they are either plaintiffs or defendants.

• Jury

The main task of jurorsis to decide which party is telling the truth.

• Court reporters

They record every thing being said and produce a transcript of the court roomproceedings. They may also be asked to produce electronic sound recordings.


Examinations Under Oath

Insurance companies generally takeexaminations under oath (EUO) when they suspect that their insured has committed an insurance fraud—e.g., his claim is phony, the true values of the property are concealed or inflated, or the claims are exaggerated


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Examinations Under Oath


Insurance companies generally takeexaminations under oath (EUO) when they suspect that their insured has committed an insurance fraud—e.g., his claim is phony, the true values of the property are concealed or inflated, or the claims are exaggerated.

Simply put, EUO protects insurance companies against fraudulent claims, allowing them to assess the scope of their obligation, deny claims, or even serve as a basis for criminal charges to be filed against the insured.

During EUO, there is no judge to control and preside over the process; the only entities present are the insured (who may be represented by counsel) a court reporter, and a lawyer.

The insured swill give sworn testimony in response to a lawyer’s question. Everything he says will be recorded by a court reporter, who will then transfer this into a booklet. The insured is then asked to review the transcription of his testimony for accuracy before signing his name.

It is important to note that EUO is not optional. Should the insured refuse to submit his refusal could be used as a basis for not paying a claim.


Interrogations

In criminal law, law enforcement authorities conduct interrogations—i.e., questioning of a witness or a suspect, who must always be informed of his legal rights, particularly his right to speak with a lawyer, and the consequences of his answers


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Interrogations


In criminal law, law enforcement authorities conduct interrogations—i.e., questioning of a witness or a suspect, who must always be informed of his legal rights, particularly his right to speak with a lawyer, and the consequences of his answers.

Should the police fail or disregardthe “Miranda Warning,” all questions and answers during interrogations are not admissible in evidence at trial.

Contrary to popular belief, police can make arrests without saying the “Miranda Warning” (which typically starts with the phrase, “You have the right to remain silent…), although it is a sacrosanct rule to say this before questioning the suspect in custody, lest all the evidence gathered during this process cannot be used at trial.

It is important to note that the Fifth Amendment of the US Constitution protects the suspect’s right against self-incrimination, while the Sixth Amendment guarantees his right to counsel in any criminal proceeding.

Furthermore, Miranda Warnings give the suspect the right to stop a police interrogation even though he has already waived the right to remain silent. The police should discontinue questioning once the person asserts his Miranda rights.


Interviews

Interviews aim to identify potential witnesses and locate them as early in the litigation as possible. Investigators (e.g., attorney lead interviewer or in-house counsel) should realize that aside from their clients, peripheral players might also give critical information that will help them prepare the “right” interview questions geared to the main players


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Interviews

Interviews aim to identify potential witnesses and locate them as early in the litigation as possible. Investigators (e.g., attorney lead interviewer or in-house counsel) should realize that aside from their clients, peripheral players might also give critical information that will help them prepare the “right” interview questions geared to the main players.

Furthermore, documents may also help investigators identify potential witnesses and obtain their names and contact information. Nowadays, the proliferation of Internet—specifically the use of social media such as Facebook and LinkedIn—could make the process of locating people much easier compared to previous decades.

Some professionals also make locating people whose whereabouts are unknown a living. Skip tracers and private investigators are good examples. While both are useful resources, the latter is believed to be more experienced and thus typically demand higher service fees; hence, their service is generally recommended only for finding critical witnesses.

Advertising in which the witness is requested to contact the investigators could also help, although this is usually treated as a last resort. Typical examples include ad in the newspaper or a poster in a high-traffic location near the accident site.

Legal Briefs

Legal briefs are written legal argument submitted by a lawyer (or party) to a court in an attempt to persuade the latter to rule in favor of his client’s interest or to counter the arguments of the opposing lawyers


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Legal Briefs


Legal briefs are written legal argument submitted by a lawyer (or party) to a court in an attempt to persuade the latter to rule in favor of his client’s interest or to counter the arguments of the opposing lawyers.

Briefs are nothing but a misnomer; typically they are notorious for being long as they must identify all the facts, legal issues, and requests (e.g., to reverse a lower court’s decision, or grant a motion during trial). This is particularly true for major arguments such as appeal.

However, a letter or memorandum brief may suffice if it only deals with minor or follow-up legal issues.

To be admissible, briefs should meet the strict procedural criteria.

Briefs are particularly helpful when making an appeal; in fact, almost all appeals are based on briefs filed by the parties. Unlike the trial court in which a trial is held to detremine the presented facts, appeals court is generally interested only in the legal reasons why it should rule in favor of a party’s position.


Phone Recordings

The legality of phone recordings is established by the federal and state wiretapping laws. It is important to note that not all states have the same regulations, thus its legality will depend on several factors.

Federal laws and most state laws require that only one party’s consent is enough to allow phone recordings. Simply put, the other parties do not have to know that their conversations are being recorded.

However, a few states require consent from all the participants, meaning each of them must know and agree that they are being recorded.

In situations where the parties are in a different state, the federal law, or the laws in either state, may apply. Hence, a good rule of thumb is to inform every party that the conversation is being recorded to avoid any legal woes.

In terms of giving consent, the other parties may not necessarily verbalize it. For instance, staying on the line after hearing a prerecorded message informing the listeners that all conversations are being recordedwill suffice.


Legal Pleadings

Legal pleadings are formal presentation of claims of the plaintiff and the defenses of the defendant, who may also submit a counterclaim explaining a cause of action against the plaintiff.

Legal pleadings also serve as a notice to the defendant about a lawsuit concerning him, and a notice to the plaintiff of the defendant’s intentions as regards to the lawsuit.

Aside from giving notice of the claim and defense, pleadings provide other functions such as expressing the issues that need to be resolved; disclosing the facts of the case; and screening the flow of cases to a specific court.

In the past, legal pleadings demanded a rigorous and complicated set of rules and formats that the court may be forced to throw out some meritorious complaints due to some technicality issues. But nowadays, almost all states may forgive some technical flaws provided that relevant facts are presented and the petition is asking for a reasonable remedy.

Judgments

Considered as the final part of a court room proceeding, a valid judgment aims to resolve all the contested issues. It specifically states who wins the case and the remedies awarded to them


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Judgments


Considered as the final part of a court room proceeding, a valid judgment aims to resolve all the contested issues. It specifically states who wins the case and the remedies awarded to them.

Remedies may include monetary damages, injunctions, or even both. Hence, judgments must be very precise—i.e., monetary damages are expressed in words instead of figures; and the injunctive reliefs must be describedpreciselyso the defendant can stop a specified act or behavior.

Judgment comes in different types. For instance, a judgment based on procedural error is called Without Prejudice; hence, the party whose case has been dismissed based on this ground may choose to bring the suit again provided that all the procedural errors are fixed. However, Judgment on the Merits cannot be re-litigated.

Meanwhile, an Agreed Judgment, also referred to as Consent Judgment, is a final decision in which the litigants have agreed. This is common in domestic relations cases in which property settlements and support settlements (e.g., child support and alimony) are the main concerns.

A court may also enter a Judgment Notwithstanding the Verdict in which it overrules the jury verdict. This is entered when the court believes there is insufficient evidence to justify the jury’s verdict.

Other types of judgments include Summary Judgment (i.e., entered early in the process of litigation), Deficiency Judgment (it involves a creditor and a debtor), and Default Judgment (i.e., the defendant fails to appear in court or one party fails to take appropriate procedural steps).


Minutes of Meeting

Minutes of meeting is the record of court room proceedings. It is different from a transcript of everything that is said because it generally highlights only key information such as the names of the lawyers and witnesses (and other key players), schedule of hearings and trials, and court rulings.

The judge or clerk of the court keeps minutes of meeting for future reference.

Minutes of meeting may also refer to a record kept by corporations describing what transpired during a company meeting, particularly of shareholders and board of directors. The secretary of the organization keeps this record.

In the corporate industry, minutes can be as short and simple as a list of decisions and actions, with the responsible person being identified. The Internal Revenue Service, auditors, and courts consider such records legal documents since they represent actions of the company leadership. In fact, legal experts do not recognize that an action has occurred when it is not included in the minutes.


Seminars and Conferences

Lawyers need continuing professional education programs as they operate in an industry where the issues and rules are not static. Almost every year there are changes in the policies, thanks to the ever-changing political, social, and economic landscape.

Because the practice of law is categorized into several groups, professionals who have a very narrow niche and want to further master the current and most relevant issues must continue their education through seminars and conferences.

Because legal practitioners are often pressed for time and may not be always available for live seminars, some organizers allow live webcasts that allow participants from any part of the world to ask questions in real time.

Video replay is another good option for busy participants. In general, this method of content delivery has streaming, search capabilities, and navigation tools to allow users find parts of the seminars and conferences they deemed to be the most important.

Agency Investigations and Investigative Interviews

Usually, the subject of an investigation is interviewed after the complainant has already been interrogated. It is a sacrosanct rule for the investigator to treat the subject with respect and fairness, and in no way should convey the message or impression that he is guilty

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Agency Investigations and Investigative Interviews



Usually, the subject of an investigation is interviewed after the complainant has already been interrogated. It is a sacrosanct rule for the investigator to treat the subject with respect and fairness, and in no way should convey the message or impression that he is guilty.

A person accused of misconduct is expected to be defensive; hence, the investigator must not give an impressive that he is “after” the subject. Nonetheless, the investigator should make it clear that authorities are taking the complaint seriously and they have a strong intention to conduct an impartial, comprehensive investigation.

Ethical investigative interviews typically include the following questions:

  • What is your response to the allegations of misconduct?
  • Can you provide additional information that is relevant to the issue?
  • Do you know anyone who may provide relevant information?
  • Can you provide documentations or any other type of physical evidence regarding the incident?
  • Why do you think the complainant make false allegations? (Should the subject insist that the allegations are false.)

  • Teleconferences and Calls

    The legality of recording teleconferences and calls may differ from state to state. However, most states law and the federal laws implement the one party consent, meaning there must be at least one person being recorded to agree even everyone else is not being notified.

    With one party consent, a person can record his own phone calls without letting others know about the recording of teleconferences and calls.

    However, consent laws have some exceptions. For instance, the law enforcement with legal warrants can record conversations without notifying anyone, or conferences with investors can be recorded without their explicit consent because recording is mandatory.

    Meanwhile, some states such as California require all party consent, meaning all the persons on the conference must be advised of the intent to record, and they must agree on it.

    It is important to note that the Federal law prohibits recording any conversation outside of one party consent, i.e., the person recording the teleconferences and calls is not part of the conversation.

    The “Wiretap Act” protects a person’s privacy in his communications with other people.


    Telephone Conversations

    The Federal law allows recording of telephone conversations with the consent of at least one party. Most state laws also adopt this one party consent.

    A few states, meanwhile, require all party consent, meaning all people involved in the telephone conversations must be notified that they will be recorded and must give their consent.

    Under a one party consent, any person can record telephone conversations provided that he is a party to the conversation. Meanwhile, anyone who records a conversation in which he is not in attendance violates the “Wiretap Act.” Most states have laws similar to or based on this Act.

    The “Wiretap Act” protects the privacy of a person’s communications with other people. However, it has someexceptions—like when the law enforcement has legal warrants for wiretapping, no party has to be notified; or the recording of conferences with investors does not need consent because it is always mandatory.